way of life

Uppsala University researchers, together with researchers from around the world, have conducted 51 studies on the contribution of DNA to physical activity and disease prevention.

All the genetic information of an organism is recorded in DNA. From eye color to figure, skin color, and traits are passed down from one generation to another. However, a recent study found DNA molecules responsible for an active lifestyle and a lazy lifestyle of sitting staring at a screen.

Researchers at Uppsala University in Sweden have reported that they have identified regions of DNA responsible for using leisure time for active activities such as exercise, sports, and screen time such as TV, cell phones, and video games. The research results have been published in the journal Nature Genetics.

Uppsala University researchers, together with researchers from around the world, have conducted 51 studies on the contribution of DNA to physical activity and disease prevention. In an experiment involving genetic data obtained from about 70,000 individuals, 99 DNA regions were identified. They report that people spend more time sitting in one place and are associated with active lifestyles.


"We found out how much time people spend in physical activity," says Ruth Loos of the Novo Nordisk Foundation Basic Metabolism Research Center at the University of Copenhagen. He said.

And researchers have shown that reducing screen time and engaging in moderate or vigorous physical activity, such as exercise, can help prevent diabetes, attention deficit disorder, depression and reduced life expectancy.

"We have confirmed that all physical activity helps reduce obesity and promote a healthy lifestyle," said Zhe Wang of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York and lead author of the paper.


Researchers have found that the DNA variants of people who spend their leisure time in front of a screen are often located near the DNA that is changed to improve muscle mass through high-intensity training. So the researchers warned that the DNA that prompts excessive use of screen time may affect the DNA that prompts exercise and affect the active lifestyle of the individual.

The researchers identified 46 genes in 99 DNA regions that may link genetics and physiological functions.